Henry Squires Tournament Shells

Discussion in 'History Buffs' started by Trap3, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    HB, a couple Tournament shells from the 1890`s. These were used in Live bird
    tournaments in 1892. E.D Fulford vs. J.C ? 100 bird event, Fulford 98 J.C. 92

    Trap3

    IMG_2567.JPG IMG_2569.JPG IMG_2570.JPG IMG_2571.JPG
     
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  2. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    Trap3,

    Would you kindly show a picture of the name below Fulford vs. ?? I'd like to see it for myself because I don't have Mr. Fulford shooting a match with any J. C. ? He had matches in 1892 with Capt. John L. "Jack" Brewer, J. A. R. Elliott, Charlie Budd and Ed Collins (50 bird match).

    You should know that J. A. R. was shooting Eley shells during that period.

    FULFORD WINS THE FIRST
    ELLIOTT BEATEN BY THE EASTERNER BY ONE BIRD


    The Race Was Close From Start to Finish – An Event of Interest to Sportsmen Throughout the United States – The Final Score 86 to 85.


    The first shoot in the series of five matches between J. A. R. Elliott of Kansas City and E. D. Fulford of Harrisburg, Pa., to decide the wing shot championship of the United States, took place at Exposition Park this afternoon and was won by Mr. Fulford. The score was Fulford 86, Elliott 85. The score at the end of the first half of the match, which was at 100 birds, was Fulford 41, Elliott 40, and the friends of the Kansas City man had hopes that he would pass the Easterner but he could not do it. The full score was as follows:

    Fulford . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 2 2 1 1 2 2 0 2 0 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1

    2 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 x 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 2 2 1 2 2 0 2 2

    1 2 2 0 1 1 2 x 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 – 86


    Elliott . . . . . . . . 0 2 1 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 0 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 2

    2 2 1 1 2 0 2 2 1 2 0 2 2 2 1 1 x 1 2 2 1 2 2 0 2 2 2 1 2 x 2 1 2 2 1 0 2 2 2 2 1

    2 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 – 85

    Last winter E. D. Fulford of Harrisburg, Pa., won a national reputation by making some phenomenal scores in a series of tap shooting matches with Jack Brewer. He defeated Brewer, who at that time was acknowledged to be the premier wing shot of America, killing 100 to 99 in the first race, 99 to 98 in the second and tied on 94 in the third race, in which it was said that Fulford’s gun went back on him. In the shoot-off at 25 birds Brewer won the last match of the series. They met again in a 250 bird race and Fulford won by a score of 223 to 217. These matches with Brewer created widespread attention and last spring Fulford challenged J. A. R. Elliott of Kansas City to a race for the American Field cup, but was defeated by the local crack by a score of 46 to 43. Elliott then went on and successfully defended the cup until it became his individual property by reason of his having held if for a period of two years.

    Fulford, smarting under his defeat by Elliott last spring and still of the opinion that he is the Kansas City man’s superior at the trap, issued a challenged to shoot Elliott a series of five matches this winter and was promptly called. The conditions of the match are five 100 bird races London Gun Club rules, King traps, for $200 each shoot and $200 additional on a majority of victories, making a total of $2,400 or $1,200 a side at stake.

    The first of this series of matches took place at Exposition ball park in this city this afternoon with James H. McGee as referee. The others are to occur as follows: At Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 19, Dr. O. F. Britton referee; at Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 22, Elmer E. Shaner, referee; at Williamsport, Pa., Dec. 24, J. H. Millspaugh referee, and at Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 26, James H. Worden referee.

    The opening shoot brought to Kansas City quite a number of sportsmen from the surrounding country, among whom were Charles W. Budd of Des Moines, champion of the Hawkeye state; F. H. Berry of the Des Moines Saturday Evening Review, who is also a well known breeder of Irish setters; C. P. Richards of Chicago, staff correspondent of the American Field; M. F. Myers of St. Joseph; Charles Whiting of Wilsey, Kas., and many others from various points in the Missouri valley.

    The weather, barring the snow on the ground, was particularly favorable for trap shooting, the air being bracing but not severe. The birds were a specially selected lot of dark color, in order that the snow should not be any more of a handicap than possible against good work. Elliott was a strong favorite before the match commenced, the local betting being governed by the poor showing made by Fulford on his visit here last spring.

    Fulford shot at twenty-five practice birds and lost four out of the bunch. Elliott shot a seven and one-fourth pound new Greener, used forty-seven grains of wood powder and one and one-eighth ounces of No. 6 shot in an Ely shell in both barrels. Fulford also used a Greener gun weighing seven pounds, twelve and one-half ounces. In the right barrel he used three and three quarter drachms of Shultze powder and one and one-quarter ounces of No. 7 shot. In the left he used three and three-quarter drachms Shultze and one and one-quarter ounces of No. 6 shot.

    [ THE KANSAS CITY STAR, (Kansas City, Missouri), December 17, 1892, page 1 ]

    I've researched Elijah D. Fulford of Utica, NY for years as well as Capt. Brewer, originally from Hammonton, NJ. Both these shooters are in my History Buff Hall of Fame and if their achievements were known, I'm quite certain both would be in the Trapshooting Hall of Fame. Both killed 100 live pigeons straight. Both were champion of the US. and both were two of the greatest shooters of the time.

    Mr. Fulford passed in 1904 at the age of 41. the good Captain Brewer died in 1913. He was about 65.

    Enjoy Our History !

    HB
     
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  3. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    The two articles on Mr. Squires from my files:

    Henry C. SQUIRES
    New York City
    Henry C. Squires & Son


    A NEW BULLET
    Which Claims to Have Superior Advantages Over Other Rifle Bullets.

    Mr. Henry C. Squires will introduce a new bullet to the shooting world in the spring. His son was kind enough to show the new idea one day last week, and explain its advantages over other rifle balls. It certainly has decided advantages if it does all young Mr. Squires claims for it. A 38-calibre lay before us. It has a Hat lop, and if it were not for a hole about an eighth of an inch in diameter, running through its centre, it would resemble an inch of steel rod a little larger than an ordinary lead pencil. The flat top and the hole through the lead are the features upon which the advantages are based, and these are increased speed, accuracy and penetration. It is called the hollow bullet, and patented, as are also the tools with which it is made and loaded into the shell.

    It was interesting to note the results of experiments made by Mr. Squires. Through any of the holes made in wood by the new bullet, an ordinary lead pencil might be easily passed. This is not the case with the opening made by the ordinary bullet, which seems to allow of the wood closing up considerably after the ball has passed through. In the old bullet's passage not more than the point of a pencil may be inserted. There is no closing up of the wood in the hole made by the new affair; it takes everything before it, making the entrance resemble the work of a keen and well-handled auger, and carrying away where it comes out fully twice as much splinter as the ordinary projectile of equal calibre. The same experiments were made upon raw beef, beef bones, and hard-seasoned wood, and in each case the bullet did far superior work. Where the ordinary ball passed through the raw meat and left no perceptible course, the other tore a vivid passage and carried away where it came out a large piece of flesh. Mr. Squires says it has been tried in various ways on deer and other large game with killing effect.

    [ SPORTING LIFE, January 3, 1891, page 10 ]


    Henry C. Squires, the senior member of the well-known gun firm of Henry C. Squires & Son, New York City, died at his home in Plainfield, N. J., last week. He had been in the sporting goods business for thirty-six years. Removal of the old-established firm a month ago to new quarters seemingly impaired Mr. Squires’ health. Mrs. Squires and five sons, two of whom were connected with the business, survive the deceased.

    [ SPORTING LIFE, October 27, 1906, page 14 ]
     
  4. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    Morning HB, sending additional pics of the Fulford shells. After looking with magnification, It is J.L Brewer... Thanks
    again for the great research and information...

    Trap3
     
  5. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    HB, Here is another pic of the Fulford Tournament Shell...

    Trap3

    Fulford Shell.JPG
     
  6. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    Trap3,

    Please take a closer look at Mr. Brewer's score on the shell. Could it possibly be 93 and not 92?

    If it is, the match took place in 1893.

    Jack Brewer's shooting days go back to the early 1880s and may even be in the '70s. He shot money matches with most of the greats, including Doc Carver, W. R. Crosby, J.A. R. Elliott, Elijah D. Fulford, William Graham, the English champion, Charley Budd, Annie Oakley and William T. Mitchell.

    A pigeon shoot between John Brewer and Miss Annie Oakley, standing respectively at thirty and twenty-four yards and shooting at fifty birds each, fifty yards boundary, came off at Pastime Park, Philadelphia, March 21. Brewer won, killing forty-five to Miss Oakley’s thirty. A return match was shot on Thursday, Brewer again winning 44 to 43.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, March 30, 1887, page 6 ]

    At Hendon, England, Monday, Captain Brewer, the famous American pigeon shot, was backed for $1,000 to kill 60 birds out of 100 off the 35 yards mark. This is a difficult task for even the best marksmen, yet the Captain was successful. He stopped 19 of the first 25, 41 out of 50, 56 out of 75 and 60, the required number, at the 81st round. The weather was dull, with an absence of wind.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, January 23, 1889, page 7 ]

    At Kansas City, April 13, J. A. R. Elliott, of that city, defended his claim to the American Field championship cup against C. W. Budd, of Des Moines, Ia., defeating the latter by the score of 49 to 46. The conditions of the match were fifty birds to each man, thirty yards rise and fifty yards boundary. Owing to Elliott’s defeat by Brewer around New York, Budd was the favorite, but he was not near up to the Kansas City man’s form.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, May 2, 1891, page 11 ]


    E. D. Fulford is undoubtedly the world's greatest pigeon shot. In the first of three matches at 100 live birds for $200a side on each match, Fulford recently defeated the famous shot Captain J. L. Brewer on the grounds of the Jersey City Heights Gun Club at Marion, N. J., by a score of 100 to 99. The match was most remarkable in view of the fact that but one bird out of 200 escaped, and that dropped dead outside the grounds. In the second match Fulford won again by "grassing" 99 birds to Brewer's 98. The third match went to Brewer by a score of 119 to 118.
    Fulford is a resident of Bridgeport, Conn., and is twenty-nine years of age. For some time he has been superintendent of construction for a telephone and telegraph company at Harrisburg. Fulford's only other performance with the gun that has attracted attention was his defeat last year of Frank Class, champion of New Jersey, by a score of 89 to 87.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, December 19, 1891, page 11 ]


    Captain John Brewer, champion wing shot, bet $250 he could kill 95 out of 100 birds in a 50-yard boundary, and $100 that he could kill 97 birds out of 100 in an 80-yard boundary. The wager was decided at Willard Park, Patterson, N.J., July 20, in the presence of a large number of well-known wing shots. Brewer lost both bets, killing 94 in the long boundary and 91 in the shorter boundary.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, August 4, 1894, page 9 ]

    At Dexter Park, Long Island, on April 3, 1895, Captain John L. Brewer performed the great feat of killing 100 pigeons straight. A wager of $50 was made that he could not kill 90 out of 100 at 30 yards rise with 50 yards boundary.
    The birds were very fast requiring the best kind of judgment in the use of the gun. Captain Brewer shot in fine form killing his cleanly in the air with the first barrel; also hitting them with the second barrel before they touched the ground. He only used the second barrel from force of habit, as the first barrel did the work effectively.


    GILBERT WON
    A 27-YARDS MAN CAPTURES THE DU PONT TROPHY
    Mr. “Hayward” the Second Prize Winner – Details of the Memorable Finish in the Great Tournament at Baltimore

    In last week's issue we gave the scores in full of the Du Pont shoot for the first two days, also the men in the tie for the trophy at the end of the third day. For the benefit of those who wish to see the scores complete in one issue we will give in tabulated form the scores of all events, excepting the one for the trophy and that we print in full. The events consisted on the first day of 5 birds, $5; 7 birds, $7; 10 birds, $10; 15 birds, $15, and a miss and out, $5; purses divided 50, 30. 20 per cent. in 5, 7 and 10 bird races, and 40, 30, 20, 10 in the 15 and 20 bird races. The second day's programme was the same, except that a 20-bird event, $20, took the place of the 15-bird event of the previous day, purses divided under class shooting rule.
    Brewer did the best shooting and lost but three birds out of 93 shot at for the two days. Fulford lost 5 out of 95 shot at, Bingham lost 7 out of 85, Wagner lost 7 out of 85, Grimm lost 7 out of 85, Hayward lost 8 out of 92, King lost 8 out of 79, Upson lost 9 out of 92, and Gilbert lost 9 out of 84. These were about the best scores made for the programme, and which included scores in a tie shoot. The birds were a very fine lot for a tournament, and on the second day contained many extra fine flyers. In a 20 bird race no one killed straight, which is proof of their good qualities. The birds in the trophy event were hardly up to those used the first two days, although it was claimed before that they would be of extra quality. The weather was simply perfect throughout and but little wind blowing, except on the last day.

    THIRD AND FOURTH DAYS.

    Owing to the large number of entries it was impossible to finish the Du Pont Trophy event in one day, and it was completed on Friday. At the end of the 11th round manager and referee. H. A. Penrose, called a postponement until the next morning. At that time there were 12 men tied on straight scores. They were D. A. Upson, D. M. Porterfield, Allen Willey, E. B. Coe, William Wagner, J. L. Brewer, Charles "Hayward," F. Gilbert, W. G. Clark. F. Cooper, O. I. Melot and J. E. Schmeck. The money then amounted to $1295, and these men agreed to divide between them the amount of money won.
    Alec. King, however, killed his last 24 straight after missing an incomer, and came in for a quarter of third and fourth money, which amounted to $97. Deducting that amount from the purse of the "combination" gave the twelve men named $90.83 each.

    24 – F. Gilbert, Spirit Lake, Iowa, 27yds.
    22111 22221 11122 21121 22222 – 25

    18 – Chas."Hayward." Baltimore, Md., 30yds.
    21121 22222 21222 22222 22122 – 25

    12 Wm. Wagner, Washington, D. C., 28yds.
    11111 11121 21101 21211 12221 – 24

    11 – E. B. Coe, Baltimore, Md., 27yds.
    11212 22221 22222 22221 20222 – 24

    8 – A. H. King, Pittsburg, Pa., 29yds.
    01112 12111 11122 22221 22222 – 24

    49 – John Brewer, New York, 33yds
    22212 22222 22221 22222 22220 – 24

    GUNS AND AMMUNITION.

    Following is a list of the guns and their weight, kind of powder used, both in the big event for the trophy in which all were obliged to use Du Pont powder, and also the load that they used in other events, where shooters could use any kind they preferred, the make of shell and amount and size of shot. This was furnished to the gun editor by each contestant:

    F. Gilbert, Smith, 8 pounds, 3 1/4 Du Pont, 1 1/8 No. 7 trap shell. Montgomery Ward & Company's
    load.

    Chas. "Hayward" (Macalester), Purdy, 7 6-16 pounds, (50 gr. E. C. 1 1/4 No. 7), 3 1/2 dr. Du Pont,
    1 1/4 No. 7, Eley's Gastight shell.

    Wm. Wagner, Parker, 7 3/4 pounds, (3 1/2 E. C.), 3 1/2 Du Pont, 1 1/4 No. 7 1/2 Rapid shells.

    E. B. Coe, Smith, 7 10-16 pounds, 3 1/4 DuPont. 1 1/4 No. 7, Smokeless shell.

    A. H. King, Scott Monte Carlo, 7 1/2 pounds, 3 1/4 Du Pont. 1 1/4 No. 7 1/2 and 7 for first and second
    barrel respectively. Trap shell.

    J. L. Brewer, Greener, 8 pounds, 4 Du Pont, 1 1/4 No. 7, Trap shell.

    D. M. Porterfield, Parker, 8 pounds, 3 1/4 Du Pont, 1 1/4 No. 8, U. M. C. factory load. Trap shell.

    "Barker," Scott, 7 1/4 pounds, 3 1/8 Du Pont, 1 3-16 No. 7. Trap shell. ( nom de plume for ?)

    Captain John L.Brewer, the greatest pigeon shooter of all, was placed at 33 yards. His first bird fell dead about, a foot outside of the dead line on the extreme outer boundary, but the dog picked up the bird before the referee got there. A shooter who reached the bird at the same time the dog did said that it was fully a foot outside, but Referee Penrose made Brewer shoot at another bird. He drew rather ordinary birds all through the race, but lost his twenty-fifth bird, which was hit hard with both barrels.

    He was using a Greener gun of high grade. His shells were the U. M. C. Trap, 3 1/4 inches long, and contained a scant 4 drams of DuPont powder, by measure; one trap wad, two\pink felts, 1/4 inch 11-gauge wads and one ordinary 12-gauge pink edge wad over the powder and 1 1/4 ounces of No. 7 chilled shot; the powder weighed 36 1/2 grains; the shell had a very hard square crimp.

    When Brewer lost his 25th bird in the big race there was great, applause, and the yelling and cheering was so prolonged that Manager Penrose had to make a request that it be stopped

    Brewer is not a popular shooter, but he was placed at 33 yard and shot a game race all the way through, and should have been treated more courteously by the spectators.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, November 2, 1895, page 12-13 ]



    He was barred from shooting the 1897 Grand American by the Interstate Association's committee and threatened legal action. He had his detractors and was somewhat cocky, but the man could shoot and shoot very well. Except, he had trouble against Mr. Fulford who trimmed him nearly every time, so for a short time, he managed Mr. Fulford in shooting matches.

    Captain John L. Brewer made another bid this morning to be allowed to enter the Grand American, but the shooting committee refused to entertain his application, claiming that they had the right to reject any gunner if they saw fit. Captain Brewer in referring to his difference with the tournament committee said to the Eagle reporter to-day:
    “I have taken counsel in this matter and will begin suit against the members of the committee in New York. I will push this matter to the bitter end and find out in the courts if the Interstate association, through its committee, had a right to reject me after I had paid my entrance fee and obtained a receipt for my money. I have neglected my business in order to get in trim to beat those Western cracks. This is not a club and there are no rules that I can discover in its by-laws and constitution that give it the right to bar anybody.” . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Captain Brewer has issued a challenge this afternoon to shoot a live bird match with anybody in the world for $1,000 a side.
    [ THE BROOKLYN EAGLE, March 24, 1897, page 2 ]


    He retired from shooting and was training hunting dogs in 1904, but he was back shooting matches in 1906, beating Walt Buckwalter, of Philadelphia, Pa., out of $100, killing 46 out of 50 pigeons to Buckwalter's 45.

    In 1907, two-time Pennsylvania champion Fred Coleman defeated Mr. Brewer in a match at 100 pigeons for $200 a side, by the score of 94 to 93.


    Captain Brewer continued to shoot on occasion, accepting matches and participating in live bird shoots in PA.

    He was run down by an automobile in April 1912. After months of recovery, he got back to shooting and fishing in the fall of 1912.

    1912, Auto Injures Crack Shot Brewer.jpg

    Captain Brewer died in June 1913 under mysterious conditions. His death was first ruled as a result of a blood clot but one doctor said the cause was poisoning while another report said it was suicide. No poising was found and the champion gave no indication of being suicidal. I truly have my doubts that J. L. Brewer caused his own death.

    HB
     
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  7. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    HB... thanks again for all the history of these great shooters. I believe the shell reads,
    E.D Fulford vs. J.L. Brewer - Mid Winter Tournament 1893 - ? can`t make out the last word.

    Trap3
     
  8. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    I went years before I was able to see what Captain J. L. Brewer looked like. I've never come across anyone with a good photograph of him and would truly appreciate one if there's anybody who has his picture.

    Here's a caricature drawing of the top shooters from a 1894 newspaper clipping.

    FULFORD, BREWER & ELLIOTT-1894.jpg

    Here's the best drawing I have of Capt. Jack Brewer

    1891-04-12, Captain John L. Brewer Picture.jpg

    Enjoy Our History !

    HB
     
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  9. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    I think you may be on to something Trap3. Could the last word possibly be UTICA, as in Utica, N.Y.?

    E. D. Fulford’s Fine Shooting

    UTICA, N. Y., Feb. 22. – At the midwinter tournament of the Oneida County Sportsmen’s Club in this city today, Capt. John L. Brewer of Bridgeton, N. J., and E. D. Fulford of Utica shot a string of 100 live birds each for a citizens’ purse of $200. The latter won, killing 98 birds to his opponent’s 93.

    [ THE NEW YORK TIMES, February 23, 1893, page ]

    Fulford Defeated Brewer

    At the mid-winter tournament of the Oneida county sportsmen’s club in Utica, N. Y., yesterday, Capt. John L. Brewer, of Bridgeton, N. J, and E. D. Fulford shot a string of 100 live birds each for a citizen’s purse of $200. Fulford won killing 98 birds to his opponent’s 93.
    [ THE HARRISBURG TELEGRAPH, (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), February 23, 1893, page 1 ]

    HB
     
  10. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Active Member

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    Jan. 21, 1893 Sporting Life
    One of the published exchanges between E.D. Fulford (winner of the 1898 GAH), Thomas S. Dando (later shooting editor of Sporting Life), Capt "Jack" Brewer, and James H. Worden regarding Fulford’s withdrawl of his commitment to shoot a match at the Riverton Gun Club (Penn.) when informed the prize would be only $50.

    Jan. 12, 1893 To E. D. Fulford
    — Dear Sir: Your telegrams received by me today. I consider this one of the rankest, stinkenest, dirty deals that one who poses as a man could possibly inflict upon another. I always thought there was some manhood about you while I was perfectly cognizant of the fact that there was very little sand, but I now rank your sand above your manhood in about the same proportion that a mosquito bears to an elephant, a pollywog to the Atlantic ocean, or in the common acceptation of the term, a monkey to a man. Any man who will stoop to make offer or use of an excuse such as you have made in this case - namely, that of a $50 note with chances of winning it and posing as the champion wingshot of the United States ought to be booted off of every shooting ground in the United States.
    Any man who will deliberately ask of a friend to enter into and obligate himself to the fulfilling of an engagement for the paltry sum of $50, ought to be hung up by the heels and knocked in the head with a club.
    A man who poses as a money maker and in the presence of several witnesses told Jim Elliott that you would go down to them and shoot and if you won would give him the purse, "certainly knew that the purse was to be contested for, not donated," as all you wanted out of it was your expenses, and then turn round and say in your telegram to me today that "we don't propose to be laughed at and walk home," is a duffer pure and simple and of the rottenest class. I wrote Mr. Dando, enclosing my letter to him as follows:
    “I leave for the Riverton Gun Club much space to extract from these telegrams. The sweetness evidently born of a full grown "posy" of the Hi-lo Jack-ass class self styled champion, and ask that they exonerate me for having had any dealings with such Farce-Acular Yaller."
    I am sir, very devoutly, J. H. WORDEN.
     
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  11. HistoryBuff

    HistoryBuff Elite Poster Founding Member

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    Ah, more on Elijah D. Fulford, one of my favorite old-time great shooters. In charge of the instaBllation of new telephone lines out Ohio way. Beat most of the well-known great shooters of the time and wasn't afraid to shot against anyone. Besides his shooting, he was an inventor who patented the Fulford Single Trigger, and traps.

    ELIJAH D. FULFORD
    1862, Long Hills, CT – 1904, Utica, New York
    American Telegram & Telegraph Company Construction Foreman
    (1891)
    Champion of the U.S. Defeating Capt. Brewer (1891)
    Supervised Construction of Telephone Lines from Chicago to New York (1892)
    Francotte Gun Company Representative (1896)
    Fulford Live Bird Trap Inventor
    Fulford Live Bird Trap Pull Inventor
    Fulford Single Trigger Inventor
    Fulford Perfected Single Trigger on Market
    (1902)
    Pole Setting Machine Inventor
    Grand American Handicap Champion
    (1898)
    U. M. C. Remington Arms Company Representative (1903)
    U. M. C. Squad Member
    Organized Gun Clubs in Tennessee

    Guns Used:

    1892 Greener
    1895 Greener S. L. 18MAY1895p.27
    1895 Greener S.L. 31AUG1895p.18
    1895 Greener S. L. 05OCT1895p.13
    1895 Greener S. L. 09NOV1895p.11
    1896 Francotte S. L. 18APR1896p.18
    1896 Francotte S. L. 30MAY1896p.19
    1897 Greener S. L.27MAR1897p.23
    1897 Greener S. L. 24APR1897p.23
    1900 Remington S. R. 14APR1900p.411


    Patent No.

    611,622 04 OCT 1898 Pigeon Trap E. D. Fulford Utica, NY
    704,024 08 JUL 1902 Single Trigger E. D. Fulford Utica, NY
    704,025 08 JUL 1901 Single Trigger E. D. Fulford Utica, NY
    749,687 12 JAN 1904 Single Trigger E. D. Fulford Utica, NY
    751,979 09 FEB 1904 Single Trigger E. D. Fulford Utica, NY
    918,432 13 APR 1909 Target Trap E. D. Fulford – Matilda Fulford Administratrix

    Such a shame he died young. Only 41 years old.

    DEATH OF E. D. FULFORD

    Elijah D. Fulford, famous the world over as a trap shot, died at his home in Utica, N. Y., Oct. 15, after a brief illness, of pneumonia. Mr. Fulford was 41 years of age, and for several years past had been employed as a shooting representative by the Union Metallic Cartridge Company and the Remington Arms Co. He was a faithful worker and never lost an opportunity to promote the interests of his employers. In 1892 Mr. Fulford established a name among shooters all over the world by defeating J. L. Brewer, at that time the acknowledged champion wing shot of the world. Fulford killed 100 birds straight and Brewer killed 99. In preliminary practice and in the match Fulford scored 421 birds straight, a feat which undoubtedly will never be equalled. E. D. Fulford was a favorite among the shooting fraternity.

    He was always good natured, genial and entertaining. He was an honest, whole-souled sportsmen and delighted in surrounding himself with a crowd and relating his experiences at trap and in field. He was an inventor of considerable note, his greatest achievement being the Fulford single trigger. He also invented an automatic target trap of great merit, besides many other things. Mr. Fulford was a native of Bridgeport, Conn. Besides his wife he leaves three brothers, John W., of Morristown, N. J.: Thomas B., of Schenectady, N. Y., and Robert, of Dillon, Mass.

    [ SPORTING LIFE, October 22, 1904, page 13 ]

    IN MEMORY OF FULFORD

    Monument

    New York, Oct. 29. – Editor "Sporting Life:" Will you kindly allow us space in which to put before your readers as briefly as possible our excuse for appearing in print? All of them are unquestionably

    aware that on Saturday, Oct. 15 last, there passed away at Utica, N. Y., one of the very best shots and one of the most whole-souled fellows in the trap shooting world;man of whom, we believe, it may truthfully be said that there was neither man, woman or child who could be reckoned as other than his friend. We refer, of course, to E. D. Fulford, whose career as a trap shooter during the past twelve years has been an exceptionally brilliant one.

    It has been suggested that very many of those whom he delighted to reckon among his friends would appreciate an opportunity of showing the esteem in which they held him. With that end in view the committee named below has been appointed which shall be known as "The E. D. Fulford Memorial Fund Committee," to whose care has been entrusted the erecting of such a monument as shall suitably express to others who did not know him as well as we did just how high in the estimation o his friends the late Mr. Fulford stood.

    Several subscriptions to the fund have already come to hand, and will be duly acknowledged. In order to simplify matter it may be as well to state that we have decided to ask Mr. James T. Skelly to act as custodian of all moneys received for the fund. Although we have received from him no formal acceptance of such a post of trust, we understand that he will act as above, and we therefore request, that all checks, postal orders, etc., relating to the fund be made out in his name, and forwarded to him, "care of E. I. duPont Company, P. O. Drawer 1001, Wilmington, Del."

    Thanking yon in advance for granting us space in which to set forth the above, we remain, the E. D. Fulford Memorial Fund Committee:

    T. H. Keller, Peters Cartridge Co., chairman;

    Frank E. Butler, U. M. C. Co.

    J. A. R. Elliott, Winchester Repeating Arms Co.

    J. S. Fanning, Laflin & Rand Powder Co

    James T. Skelly, E. I. duPont Co.
    [ SPORTING LIFE, November 5, 1904, page 14 ]


    1905-FULFORD MEMORIAL, S.R., 24JUN1905p673.jpg

    Enjoy Our History !

    HB
     
  12. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Active Member

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    The first Grand Smokeless Championship Handicap Live-bird Tournament given by the E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co. took place October 22 - 25, 1895 at Baltimore, Md. All the events were at live pigeons at the 30-yard mark, and three sets of traps were used. The DuPont Trophy was shot Oct 24 & 25 due to darkness after 11 birds on the 24th.
    Fred Gilbert using a L.C. Smith and Charles “Hayward” Macalester (Purdey) tied at 25; Gilbert won the shoot-off 5/5 to 4/5. Charles Wagner (Parker), E.B. Coe (Smith), John Brewer (Greener), and A.H. King (Scott Monte Carlo) tied at 24; Wagner won the shoot-off taking 3rd place.
    http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1895/VOL_26_NO_05/SL2605012.pdf
    http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1895/VOL_26_NO_06/SL2606012.pdf
    Gilbert used a Smith gun, 8 pounds, and his load consisted of a scant 3 1/4 drams Du Pont, by measure, which weighed 42 grains. It was wadded with a Winchester field wad, a 3/8-inch pink felt and an ordinary pink edge, all 12-gauge and 1 1/8 ounces of No. 7 chilled shot. The shells were loaded by Ed. Bingham for the firm, of Montgomery Ward & Co., of Chicago.

    Gilbert was appointed representative of the DuPont Company, with the entire United States as his territory. He also traveled for Lefever, shooting one of the company’s doubles, before switching back to a L.C. Smith. Orders for Live Bird guns poured in with the “Fred Gilbert Specifications”: drop at comb of 1 3/8 inches; at the heel, 2 inches; length from trigger to heel, 14 1/4 inches; trigger to toe 14 1/2 inches; and trigger to center of butt 14 inches; with a full pistol grip and 30-inch full choke barrels.

    Von Lengerke & Antoine released a "Gilbert Live Bird" load; 1 1/4 oz with 3 1/2 Dr. Eq. DuPont Bulk with No. 7 shot in a 3" Winchester Leader case with "Special Wadding Gilbert"

    [​IMG]

    In 1897 he held the "E.C." Inanimate Target Cup, the Kansas City Star Cup and the DuPont Live Bird Championship Trophy using a L.C. Smith, 3 3/4 drams DuPont Bulk smokeless powder, 1 1/4 No. 7 chilled shot in Winchester Leader shells.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  13. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    Head stamp of one the Henry Squires Tournament Shells...

    Trap3

    IMG_3861.JPG
     
  14. Monty 201

    Monty 201 New Member

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    Thank You
     
  15. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    Another example...

    Trap3

    Tournament Shell #3.JPG
     
  16. Trap3

    Trap3 Active Member

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    This shell loaded with 3 3/4 dr. Wood powder 1 1/4 7`s...

    Trap3

    Tournament Shell 3.JPG
     
  17. Flyersarebest

    Flyersarebest Moderator Founding Member

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    "He had his detractors and was somewhat cocky, but the man could shoot and shoot very well."

    Wonder if he ever bounced that Greener off the pad.
     
  18. Jakearoo

    Jakearoo Well-Known Member

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    HB, You are truly amazing.
    I hope you have the incredible fount of information you know and have collected put into some form/place where it will survive and be accessible long into the future.
    I have always had great respect for knowledge and people who gather and contribute to it.
    My thanks, Jake
     
    Trap3 likes this.

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